Thursday, October 23, 2014

AncestryDNA and 23andMe (V3) transfer offer from Family Tree

(additional information of the transfer offer from Family Tree to people who test with AncestryDNA and 23andMe)

Family Tree DNA is now allowing people that have taken an AncestryDNA™ or 23andMe© (V3) test to transfer their raw data to the Family Finder database for FREE by visiting www.familytreedna.com/AutosomalTransfer!
 
That’s right!  Pass this news along to your friends and family members that have tested with Ancestry.com or 23andMe so they can discover new matches in the world’s largest genetic genealogy database for FREE!  
 
Note: Autosomal raw data cannot be transferred to an account that already has Family Finder
 
What’s in it for You?
After transferring, you’ll get your top 20 matches, complete with their surnames and relationship predictions.  You don’t have to do anything after uploading your data to see these matches.  You’ve got nothing to lose!

You can unlock ALL of your matches and myOrigins results for free by recruiting 4 other relatives or friends to transfer their results using a link we’ll provide!

Unlock Right Away for Just $39
If you do not want to wait for 4 others to transfer, we are also permanently reducing the price to unlock all of your matches and myOrigins results to just $39!  
 
Once a transfer has purchased or referred 4 others they will unlock the full Family Finder experience!
 
How Does it Work?
New customers must enter their name and email address to get started.  If you already have an FTDNA account, just click Already have a Family Tree DNA account?

Next, click ‘Upload Raw Data’ to select and upload the raw data file from AncestryDNA™ or 23andMe© (V3) from your computer.  It is not necessary to unzip the file prior to uploading it.  If you don’t have your raw data file handy, instructions on how to download it will be available.

The first round of results processing will take about an hour and an email notification will be sent to the registered email address after we are done processing the raw data.

Ulster Heritage Magazine: Transfer your 23andMe©(V3) or AncestryDNA™

Family Tree DNA is offering free transfers from 23andMe and AncestryDNA.  This is an excellent opportunity to upload your existed data into Family Tree's data base. 

Link:  23andMeV3 and AncestryDNA Transfers



Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Scots-Irish DNA Project Update 21 October 2014

Scots-Irish DNA project update 21 October 2014

The Scots-Irish DNA project has 504 participants as of this date.  Family Tree has added many new haplogroups and our project is now updated to include this.  The many new haplogroups are downstream from the major designations and represent more recent genetic mutations.  Many of the new haplogroups are linked to geographic locations.  The research is so new it is hard to post news of them as the data is still coming in.  But, eventually, those participants that have done extensive SNP testing should gain a much better understanding of their family's point of origin.

Some notes: non-surname matches are very important at the 67 and 111 levels.  In parts of Scotland surnames were not fixed until the 1600s and creation of new surnames from nicknames, aliases, or clan based surnames was common.  I have even observed several adoption of maternal surnames in paternal lines that married prominent women from another clan.  An example of a nickname being turned into a surname, Seamus Mac Dónaill Glass (the grey McDonald) living early 1700s and his sons just being known as the 'Gray' family.

One key to successful family research is observing geographic clues.  Look at the "Paternal Ancestor Names" of your match group for any geographic information.  The reason this is some important, families were in general very static and tending to stay in the same area of centuries.  Even among the Ulster Scots, this would be true in Scotland and then after migration to Ireland, they tended to stay in the district they initially settled. This pattern changed after the industrial age, but still there is general a cluster of matches where the family initially settled.

If you locate a geographic point of interest, you will want to look at the primary sources for that area.  Often you will find your surname, or some variation of it, at that location.  Some very good records for Scots-Irish families are the 1630 and 1642 muster rolls.  There function as a type a census as each family was expected to have their able bodied men report to the muster.
 
I also would ask everyone to go on your Family Tree page in enter your Paternal Ancestor Data. Make sure it is your direct paternal line (we have some that have enter maternal lines, again, the Y chromosome follows a man's direct paternal line, it is only passed from father to son, it cannot go through a maternal line).
 
If you are interested in your "Ancestral Origins"  make sure you have your 12 and 25 level results turned on.  This will show you your distant match group by geographic location.  The higher the percentage the greater the relevance.   Most of the Scots-Irish participants are descendants of the Insular Celts, these are the indigenous Celtic tribes of both Highland and Lowland Scotland.  We do have a fair number of Norse/Norman participants, and the a few haplogroups that are associated with parts of Europe that suggest a Roman Empire connection or in some cases medieval trading families.
 
For those of you with Highland Scot origin, Amazon has the Ulster Heritage book 'The Laggan Redshanks' on sale at present.  This book concerns the Highland Scots that settled in east Donegal and northwest Tyrone in the late 1500s.  We hope to get out a similar book on the Highland Scots that settled in north Antrim, which is the other major source of Highland Scots, or Redshanks as they were called, in Ulster.
Our blog address is:
http://thescotsirish.blogspot.com/  (The Scots-Irish Blog)

Anyone that has a family history update, interesting Scots-Irish news, and short articles on Scots-Irish people, society, culture, food, etc., are urged to submit to the blog.  You may also post news of your own personal Family Tree surname project.  It is an excellent way to get the word out and encourage men with your surname to test.  Many of our participating families have located their cousins in Ireland and Scotland by "getting the word out."
 
The best of luck with your research. 

 

Monday, October 13, 2014

R-L21 Haplogroup and the Scots-Irish

 
Above is a map showing the location of the R-L21 Haplogroup.  R-L21 Haplogroup and the growing number of downstream (more recent in chronology) is the haplogroup of the majority of the Scots-Irish.  Historically it represents the 'Western Atlantic Celtic' population, which includes the Insular Celts, both Gaelic and Cumbric.   In layman's language, this population has it origins in the indigenous Celtic tribes of Britain and Ireland.  Within the Scots-Irish population this includes the native Cumbric Celtic tribes of what we now call the Scottish Lowlands, and the Gaelic population.  This tells us the majority of the people in the New World that identify as 'Scots-Irish' are the descendants of the indigenous Celts of the British Isles and Ireland.  (map is from the Eupedia website)

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

John Steinbeck and his Scots-Irish mother

Many families married into the Scots-Irish.  German families in the Upland and backwood South often became part of Scots-Irish society.  Here is a link to an article on John Steinbeck with information of his Scots-Irish mother. 

Link:  Okie Faces & Irish Eyes: John Steinbeck & Route 66 (From Irish America Magazine)

Friday, October 3, 2014

Texian Militia 1835


The Battle of Gonzales 2 October 1835


The Battle of Gonzales was fought near Gonzales, Texas, on 2 October 1835, between Texian settlers and a detachment of Mexican army troops. It was the first battle of the Texas War for Independence.  The majority of the Texians were Scots-Irish who had moved to Texas from Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama.

In 1831, Mexican authorities gave the settlers of Gonzales a small cannon to help protect them from frequent Comanche raids. During the ensuing four years, the political situation in Mexico deteriorated and in 1835 several states, including Texas, revolted.  Colonel Domingo de Ugartechea, the commander of all Mexican troops in Texas, requested the return of the cannon.

Design of the original Gozales flag

This request was refused and Ugartechea sent 100 dragoons to retrieve the cannon. The soldiers neared Gonzales on 29 September. The colonists negotiated with the Mexican troops but also sent messengers to request help from nearby communities. Within two days, up to 140 Texians gathered in Gonzales. On 1 October 1835, the Texian militia voted to fight rather than surrender their cannon.  The Texian militia was led by John Henry Moore, originally of Rome, Tennessee, who had settled in Texas in 1818.  Mexican soldiers opened fire as Texians approached their camp in the early hours of October 2.  The two sides exchanged fire for several hours, after which the Mexican troops retreated.

The skirmish marked a clear break between the colonists and the Mexican government and is considered to have been the start of the Texas Revolution. News of the skirmish spread throughout the United States, where it was often referred to as the "Lexington of Texas".

Modern version of the Gozales flag, still in use


Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Families in Londonderry, 1619-1800

SCOTS-IRISH ORIGINS, 1600-1800A.D.
GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS OF THE SCOTS-IRISH IN COUNTY LONDONDERRY, IRELAND
PART THREE - ‘THE MAIDEN CITY’
THE INHABITANTS OF THE CITY OF DERRY / LONDONDERRY BEFORE THE SIEGE (c.1600-1688)


By Bob Forrest, B.A. Hons; Economic and Social History (Queen’s University, Belfast). 112 pages, over 2000 surnames
This is the third volume in the Scots-Irish Origins series. This volume focuses on the historic city of Derry/Londonderry in the seventeenth century and makes available a number of valuable and unique sources for the period.
The following seventeenth century records are included in this volume for the city of Derry/Londonderry:-
- the 1619 Inquisition,
- 1622 Muster Roll
- 1628 Rent Roll
- 1630 Muster Roll (599 names)
- 1642 Muster Rolls (9 companies)
- 1654/6 Civil Survey, 1659 Census
- 1663 Hearth Money Roll
- as well as numerous miscellaneous records including; Corporation records (Governors, Mayors, Aldermen, Sheriffs), lists of merchants and seamen linked to the port of Derry, Gravestone Inscriptions from the seventeenth century, siege records, Summonister (court) records (1611-1670), Will indexes (1600-1700), original will abstracts, and a list of Derry voters from 1697.

Link to Purchase:  Scots-Irish Origins


By Bob Forrest, B.A Hons; Economic and Social History (Queen’s University, Belfast). 112 pages, over 2000Inhabitants of Londonderry before the Siege surnames.
This is the third volume in the Scots-Irish Origins Series. This volume focuses on the historic City of Derry/Londonderry in the seventeenth century and makes available a number of valuable and unique sources for the period.

Derry is set in a beautiful location having been built on sloping hills set against the backdrop of the Inishowen mountains at a curve on the river Foyle and is one of the longest, continually inhabited places in Ireland with a record of monastic settlement dating from 545A.D. ‘The Derrie’, or ‘the oak-grove’, was an island area situated on the Foyle and became a settlement of strategic importance but remained an isolated outpost until the late sixteenth century. Sir Henry Dowcra’s military expedition, which arrived in Lough Foyle in May 1600, at the height of the Nine Years War, was instrumental in paving the way for the plantation of Ulster that began only a few years later under James I. After Dowcra, the British stayed in the northwest and by the early seventeenth century Derry had become a frontier settlement at the heart of the Ulster Plantation scheme.

The city was renamed Londonderry reflecting the involvement of the London Companies in the plantation of the county of Coleraine (also renamed Londonderry), and one of their obligations was to build a city at the site of Derry. The new planned city had an historic military function and extant muster rolls exist for the city for 1622, 1630 and 1642 and give indication of Derry’s origins as a garrison town. The city survived two sieges and repulsed all attacks during the seventeenth century. It was the resilience of Derry that largely ensured the survival of the Ulster plantation in the seventeenth century.

The purpose of this work is to identify the families and people resident in Derry in the seventeenth century, especially in the period before the siege. The colony planted by Dowcra was predominantly English in character but during the reign of James I increasing numbers of Scots from surrounding areas such as Rathmelton and Raphoe (Donegal) crowded into the new town searching for work. Trade links with Scotland were strong especially with the ports on the western seaboard. By 1630 Derry was the largest settlement in Ulster and had a population of 500 adult males and was similar insize to Boston, which in 1640 had a population of 1,200. In 1637, the surveyor-general of customs noted that the Scots heavily outnumbered the English in Derry. The rapid growth of the Scottish colony was remarkable and this is reflected in the surnames in the hearth returns for the city and liberties in 1663. By 1700 Derry had a population of over two thousand and the most impressive town in Ulster with its walls and regular street plan. Commerce was central to the life of Londonderry, which became a busy shipping port and this volume gives evidence of maritime, mercantile and craft elements present in the city in the seventeenth century.

Mr. Forrest has utilized a wide range of sources for this publication: Burgh records in Scotland, House of Common’s Journals, Calendar of State Papers, Calendar of Treasury Books, and the records from the National Archives of Scotland and the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland in order to identify the inhabitants of Derry and with over 2000 surnames this volume gives comprehensive listing of the inhabitants of the city before the siege.

The following seventeenth century records are included in this volume for the city of Derry/Londonderry:-
- the 1619 Inquisition,
- 1622 Muster Roll
- 1628 Rent Roll
- 1630 Muster Roll (599 names)
- 1642 Muster Rolls (9 companies)
- 1654/6 Civil Survey, 1659 Census
- 1663 Hearth Money Roll
- as well as numerous miscellaneous records including; Corporation records (Governors, Mayors, Aldermen, Sheriffs), lists of merchants and seamen linked to the port of Derry, Gravestone Inscriptions from the seventeenth century, siege records, Summonister (court) records (1611-1670), Will indexes (1600-1700), original will abstracts, and a list of Derry voters from 1697.
The following surnames can be found in this book:
ABBOT, ACORNE, ADAIR, ADAM, ADAMS, ADDERTON, ADDISON, ADAIR, ADARE, ADERTON, ADMISTON, AIKEN, AKENHEAD, AKINE, ALCORNE, ALEXANDERS, ALL, ALLAN, ALLANE, ALLECEN, ALLEN, ALLESTER, ALLEXANDER, ALLINE, ALLINSON, ALLYSON, ALSEN, ALSON, ANDERSON, ANDERTON, ANDROS, ANDROSS, ANKOR, ANKTILL, APLEN, APLIN, APLINE, APPLETON, AP-RICHARDS, APTON, ARBUCKELL, ARBUCKLE, ARCHER, ARCHY, ARCKETILL, ARDOCK, ARKWRIGHT, ARMSTRONG, ARTHUR, ASBURY, ASH, ASHBRIG, ASHE, ASHBURY, ASHDONE, ASHE, ASTRY, ATCHESON, ATCHISONN, ATKIN, ATKINSON, AUBERRY, AUSTEN, AVERELL, BABINGTON, BACON, BAILEY, BAGENALL, BAGNAL, BAGGS, BAKER, BAKON, BAILY, BAIRD, BALE, BALER, BALIFF, BALL, BALLARK, BALLAS, BALER, BALRIGE, BAMBRIDGE, BANCKES, BANKES, BAR, BARR, BARBER, BARKER, BARNARD, BARNES, BARNET, BARNSLY, BARR, BARRINGTON, BARRY, BARTLET, BARTON, BARWICKE, BASILL, BASLY, BASTARD, BATE, BATEMAN, BAUX, BAXTER, BAYLEY, BAYLY, BAYLYE, BEAMES, BEARDE, BEATY, BEAUMONT, BEAURIGE, BECK, BECKE, BEGARD, BEGGE, BEGGS, BELL, BEN, BENDENE, BENDERMAN, BENNET, BENEY, BENNETT, BENSON, BERESFORD, BERKETT, BERKELY, BERRY, BETSON, BEYLANDS, BICKERSTAFF, BINDINS, BINGLEY, BINGLY, BIRD, BIREY, BIRNE, BIRNIE, BISHOPP, BITROW, BIVES, BLACK, BLACKBORNE, BLACKBURN, BLACKE, BLACKER, BLACKHORNE, BLACKWELL, BLACKWOOD, BLAIR, BLAND, BLANY, BLUNDELL, BLUNKET, BOGG, BOGGE, BOGGES, BOGGS, BOHANAN, BOID, BOOTH, BORES, BOUGHAN, BOURKE, BOWEN, BOWSER, BOWYER, BOYD, BOYDE, BOYLES, BOYNE, BRABAZON, BRADIN, BRADY, BRAGG, BRAMPTON, BRAMSON, BRAMSTONE, BRARESHILL, BRASIER, BRAZIER, BRELLAHAN, BRICE, BRIDERS, BRIDEMAN, BRIDGES, BRIGHTE, BRIERS, BRIGHT, BRISSON, BROME, BROOKE, BROOKES, BROOKS, BROOME, BROSTER, BROWN, BROWNE, BROWNING, BRUNETT, BRUCE, BRYLAND, BUBBY, BUCHANAN, BURDINS, BULL, BULLACK, BURDIST, BURGESS, BURK, BURKE, BURLEIGH, BURLY, BURNES, BURNESIDE, BURNETT, BURNEY, BURNSIDE, BURNSYD, BURRELL, BURTON, BUTLER, BUTTON, BYAR, BYARS, BYERS, BYRES, CADE, CAHAN, CAHANE, CAHOWNE, CAIRNES, CAIRNS, CALBREATH, CALISE, CALDWELL, CALHOUN, CALLWELL, CALVEILL, CALWELL, CAMBELL, CAMBLE, CAMEL, CAMELL, CAMPBELL, CAMPIAN, CAMPSEY, CAMPSIE, CAMSY, CANNING, CANWELL, CAPP, CARBUT, CARIDGE, CARLETON, CARLILL, CARMIHILL, CARNES, CARE, CAREY, CARNES, CARR, CARRIGAN, CARRIGEN, CARRINGTON, CARSELL, CARSWELL, CARTER, CARY, CARYE, CASELL, CASKEY, CASON, CASSRONE, CASTELL, CECIL, CHADDOCK, CHALMERS, CHAMBERS, CHAPMAN, CHAPTMAN, CHESAN, CHETWOOD, CHICHESTER, CHILDS, CHILES, CHRISTUELL, CHRISTWELL, CHRISTYE, CHURCH, CLANTON, CLAPONE, CLAPP, CLARE, CLARK, CLARKE, CLARKSON, CLARSON, CLAVE, CLAYDE, CLAYTON, CLEGG, CLEID, CLEMENCE, CLEMENT, CLEMENTS, CLENAGHAN, CLINTON, CLOYD, CLOYDE, CLUIG, CLYDE, CLYTON, COALE, COATCH, COCHERAN, COCHERANE, COCHRAN, COCHRANE, COCKAYNE, COCKBARNE, COCKE, COCKEN, COCKENS, COCKER, COCKRAN, COCKRANE, COCKS, COGHERAN, COGHERON, COHOUNE, COLE, COLHOUNE, COLLINS, COLUINE, CONINGHAM, CONINHAM, CONLAY, CONNINGHAM, CONNOCK, CONNOR, CONOHER, CONOLLY, CONYNGHAM, COOK, COOKE, COOMES, COOP, COOPER, COOTE, COOTES, COPE, CORMACK, CORNHILL, CORNWALL, CORRION, CORRY, COTESMER, COTMORE, COTTESMORE, COTTISMORE, COTYMORE, COURTNEY, COVAN, COWAN, COWEY, COWPER, COX, COYLE, CRAFORD, CRAFFORD, CRAG, CRAGE, CRAGG, CRAGHEAD, CRAIG, CRAIGE, CRAKSHANK, CRACKSHANESSE, CRANE, CRANEEN, CRAVAN, CRAVEEN, CRAVEN, CRAYFORD, CRAYTON, CRAWFFORDE, CRAWFORD, CRESWELL, CROASE, CROFTON, CROFTS, CROKETT, CROMIE, CROOKESHANKES, CROOKESHANKS, CROOK, CROOKS, CROOKSHANK, CROOKSHANKS, CROSER, CROSS, CROSTS, CROW, CROWTHER, CRUICKSHANK, CRUKSHANKS, CUIN, CUISTION, CULBERSON, CULILAND, CUMMELL, CUNINGHAM, CUNINGHAME, CUNNINGHAM, CUNSTALL, CURIE, CURINGHAM, CURLING, CURLINGE, CURRY, CUST, CUTBERTSON, CUTHBERTSON, DALLAWAY, DANE, DANIELL, DANIELSON, DANY, DANYE, DAUIS, DAUISSON, DAVEY, DAVIES, DAVENPORT, DAVIS, DAVISON, DAVY, DAVYES, DAWBY, DAWLEY, DAWNAM, DAWSON, DEAL, DEALE, DECON, DELAP, DELAPP, DE-LAVIE, DE-LAVIS, DENNISON, DENNEY, DENNY, DENSYNE, DEVENNY, DICKES, DIGGS, DILLION, DINN, DIXON, DOAKE, DOBBIN, DOBBS, DOBSON, DODDINGTON, DOGHIRTY, DOLLMAN, DOLLWAY, DONELLAN, DONELDSON, DONELLSONN, DONNELSOM, DONNELSON, DORAN, DORNE, DOUGALL, DOUGHARTY, DOUGHERTY, DOUGLAS, DOUGLASS, DOUGLESS, DOUL, DOWAY, DOWDALL, DOWELL, DOWEY, DOWGALL, DOWNE, DOWNEING, DOWNES, DOWNING, DRAPER, DRIVER, DROSTER, DRUMMOND, DRURY, DUCE, DUDLES, DUGLAS, DUGLEISH, DUGLISH, DULAP, DULAPP, DUMBAR, DUNBAR, DUNBARR, DUNCAN, DUNKAN, DUNKIN, DUN, DUNBAR, DUNBARR, DUNN, DURDOK, DUTTON, DYKES, DYLLAN, EADIE, EARLS, EDGEWORTH, EDMONDS, EDMONSTONE, EDWARD, EDWARDS, EIDEN, ELDER, ELKES, ELLICOCK, ELLINGSWORTH, ELLIOT, ELLIOTT, ELLIS, ELVIN, ENALLRE, ENCHE, ENGLISH, ENICKSON, ERSKINE, ERWIN, ERWINE, ERWYN, ESPIE, EVANS, EVERS, EVERY, EVIN, ELVINE, EWEING, EWIN, EWING, EWRYE, EYERS, FANE, FAR, FARALD, FARBASCO, FARBET, FARGISHILL, FARMER, FARMES, FARQUHAR, FARR, FAULCONER, FENUY, FERGISON, FERGUSON, FERGUSSONE, FERRIER, FERRON, FERRY, FFINCH, FFOLLIOT, FFLANELL, FFLEMINGE, FFRANCKLAND, FRANKLINN, FFULTON, FILSELL, FINCH, FINDLAY, FINLEY, FINNIE, FINNSTON, FISHER, FIXTER, FLAVEL, FLEMIN, FLEMING, FLEMINGE, FLETCHER, FLEUILL, FOKER, FOLIOT, FOLLIOT, FOLLIOTT, FORGISSON, FORRESTER, FORSTER, FORSYTH, FORTESCUE, FORTISCUE, FORWARD, FOSTER, FOWELL, FOWLER, FOX, FOXLEY, FRAMPTON, FRAZIER, FREEBORNE, FREEMAN, FREMAN, FREN, FRENCH, FREWEN, FRIXTER, FRONDE, FUISH, FULLER, FULLERTON, FULLERTONN, FULTON, FUSHEY, FYNLEY, FYNLY, GAGE, GAINE, GAIT, GAJE, GALBEATH, GALBRAETH, GALBRAITH, GALLAGHER, GALLAUGHER, GALLOHER, GALTWORTH, GAMBELL, GAMBLE, GANNE, GARDELL, GARDENER, GARDINER, GARDNER, GARNET, GARY, GATE, GATES, GAULT, GAW, GAWLIAM, GAY, GEERING, GELVERY, GENIONS, GEORGE, GEVEN, GEYMES, GIBBON, GIBBS, GIBSON, GIBSONN, GIFFIN, GIFFINE, GIFFORD, GIFFORE, GIFFORDE, GILCHRIST, GILES, GILL, GILLASPY, GILKSONN, GILLER, GILLESPIE, GILLESPY, GILLIERE, GILLPATRICKE, GILLSONN, GILPATRICK, GILSONE, GIMBLE, GLADSTANES, GLASGOW, GLENN, GLOWRE, GLOVER, GOBURNE, GODBOLD, GODFREY, GODMAN, GOEBRETH, GOLDSMITH, GOLTERYE, GOODFELLOW, GOODWIN, GOODYEER, GOOSE, GORDON, GORE, GORGE, GORGES, GORMAN, GOTERY, GOTTERY, GOWEN, GRACE, GRAIDY, GRAFT, GRAHAM, GRAHAME, GRAHAMES, GRASSE, GRAUE, GRAVE, GRAVELL, GRAY, GRAYE, GREDINE, GREEN, GREENLEES, GREG, GREGG, GREGOR, GREHAMES, GRENE, GREYME, GRIFFE, GRIFFEN, GRIFFIN, GRIFFINE, GRIFFITH, GRIGSON, GRIMES, GRINSTEED, GRISKINGS, GRODYE, GROERTYE, GROFVENOR, GROVE, GROVES, GRYER, GRYMES, GUGHTREDGE, GUINE, GUNTER, GUTHERY, GUTHRYE, GUY, GWINE, GWYNN, GYLES, GYLLES, HAILE, HAIRE, HAIRES, HAIRS, HALL, HALLE, HALLEY, HALSHTON, HALTON, HAMAN, HAMBLETON, HAMEL, HAMELL, HAMIL, HAMILL, HAMILTON, HAMILTONN, HAMMILTON, HAMMILTOUNE, HAMMON, HAMMOND, HAMOND, HANAH, HANDASYDE, HANCOCK, HANDCOCK, HANDFORD, HANDLINGE, HANFORD, HANMER, HANKES, HANKOLY, HANNA, HANNOCK, HARCOUGH, HARDMAN, HARE, HARETOP, HARISON, HARISONE, HAROLL, HARPER, HARRAWAY, HARRINGTON, HARRISON, HARRYE, HART, HARTE, HARTT, HARTWELL, HARVEY, HARVYE, HARYSON, HARWOD, HASELLWOOD, HASTON, HAUGTEN, HAWARD, HAWKE, HAWKES, HAWKINS, HAY, HAYE, HAYDEN, HAYRE, HEA, HEARD, HEATH, HEATLYE, HEATON, HEGGARD, HEMSWORTH, HEMYN, HEARD, HEATH, HENDER, HENDERSON, HENDMAN, HENRICK, HENRY, HENRYE, HEPBOURNE, HEPBURNE, HERD, HERRIS, HERY, HEWAT, HEWESTON, HEYE, HILHOUSE, HILL, HILLE, HILLHOUSE, HINCKSONE, HINDEMAN, HINDMAN, HINKESON, HINSON, HOBSON, HOBSONN, HODGKINS, HOGG, HOLDING, HOLLAND, HOLMES, HOME, HOMESONN, HONE, HONEY, HOODE, HOPKINS, HOPPON, HORN, HOROSTON, HOSLOCKE, HOUGHTON, HOULE, HOUSE, HOUSELOCK, HOUSTON, HOUSTONE, HOUSTONN, HOW, HOWE, HOWELL, HOWARD, HOWESON, HOWESONN, HOWTON, HOYLE, HUCHESON, HUDCEN, HUDSON, HUDSONN, HUES, HUEY, HUFTON, HUGHES, HULLS, HULLYE, HUMBESTONE, HUMES, HUNT, HUNTER, HUNTERHURD, HUSCOCK, HURST, HUSTON, HUSTONE, HUTCHISONN, HUTCHON, HUTSON, HUSTONE, HUTTON, HYNDMAN, HYNES, HYNN, INCHE, INGLIS, ISLEN, IRISH, IRWIN, IRWYN, JACKARD, JACKET, JACKSON, JACKSONN, JACON, JAMESON, JAMISON, JEFFRYS, JEFFS, JEMMET, JENKIN, JENKINE, JENKINES, JENNINGS, JENNINS, JENNY, JEREMY, JOANES, JOHNES, JOHNSON, JOHNSTON, JOHNSTONE, JONES, JORDAN, JOURDEM, JOURDAN, JOURDEN, KADWALLADER, KANAN, KANE, KANNE, KARR, KEAN, KEARNS, KEAWORTH, KEELAND, KEENE, KEILE, KELLY, KELLYE, KENDRICK, KENEDYE, KENNEDY, KENNY, KENRICK, KENWOOD, KER, KERBYE, KERKE, KERNES, KERR, KETLEBYE, KEYES, KEYLE, KEYMYN, KEYS, KIDEL, KILL, KILNER, KILPATRICK, KINASTON, KING, KINGE, KINGSTON, KINKAIDE, KINKEAD, KINNISTON, KIRBY, KIRK, KITCHINE, KITWALLADER, KNEALAND, KNEELAND, KNELAN, KNELAND, KNIGHT, KNOBBS, KNOBS, KNOCKS, KNOTT, KNOWELS, KNOWLES, KNOX, KYLE, KYLL, KYLLE, KYNASTON, KYNG, LABAL, LABE, LACI, LAMAN, LAMKIN, LANCE, LANE, LANG, LANGEMORE, LANGFORDE, LANGMORE, LANGTON, LAPSLEY, LARGE, LASON, LATHAM, LATHEM, LATHUM, LATHUN, LAULIN, LAULY, LAUTY, LAVEY, LAWE, LAWRENCE, LAWRY, LAWSON, LAWSONN, LAWTIE, LAWTON, LAYON, LEA, LEACH, LEACHEN, LEAKE, LECKY, LEAP, LESTON, LEATHEM, LECKIE, LECKY, LEDIAT, LEE, LENEN, LENOX, LENNOX, LENRY, LERGE, LESLIE, LESLY, LESTON, LEWIS, LEY, LIDSUM, LINDSAY, LINDESAY, LINDSEY, LINDSEYE, LINNE, LITROW, LOGAN, LOGG, LOGGAN, LONE, LONG, LONGE, LOUGH, LOUGHEAD, LOUTHER, LOW, LOWRIE, LOWRY, LOWTHER, LUCAS, LUNDIE, LUNDY, LYN, LYNDSAY, LYNDSIE, LYNN, LYNNE, LYNTON, LYON, MACBELLANE, MACCABRID, MACCHIRKSON, MACCLAIE, MACCLELAND, MACCLOUKES, MACCONNELL, MACCORKILL, MACCORRIGAN, MACCREE, MACGENNLY, MACGORE, MACGORMLEY, MACGROGERTY, MACGRORTY, MACGOWNE, MACK, MACKAY, MACKEY, MACILCONNEL, MACKENNLIE, MACKENZIE, MACKIE, MACKILDUFF, MACKILLNEY, MACKINNEY, MACKINNY, MACLAGHLIN, MACLCONNEL, MACKMATH, MACKRERY, MACKRONE, MACQUIGLEY, MACLOGHLIN, MACNICHOL, MACCOLLOGH, MACONAHYE, MACOWELL, MACPHETRIX, MACSWINE, MACAULY, MACWARD, MADDAN, MADER, MADERELL, MADERNELL, MADLEY, MADOX, MAGEE, MAGHLIN, MAGOWEN, MAGOWNE, MAINE, MAIOR, MAIRE, MAJOR, MAKAYE, MAKEE, MAKEIR, MAKENNIS, MAKEYE, MAKIM, MAKING, MAKKAY, MAKLANE, MALCOLLUM, MANBY, MANESFIELD, MANESOOTH, MANSFIELD, MANSON, MARCEY, MARDOCK, MARE, MAROW, MARROW, MARSDEN, MARSH, MARSHALL, MARSTONE, MARTIALL, MARTIN, MARTINE, MASON, MASTERS, MATGINSEY, MATHEW, MATHEWES, MATHREWES, MATTHRO, MATIRE, MAULAN, MAXFIELD, MAXWELL, MAY, MAYOR, McARTAN, McBOYLE, McBREAN, McCACLES, McCALLAN, McCAMUL, McCAMUS, McCAN, McCARKAN, McCARMICK, McCARRUNGALL, McCARTHY, McCAVERE, McCAWLEY, McCAY, McCARRELL, McCLELLAND, McCLELLANY, McCLENAGHAN, McCOLE, McCOLLON, McCOMBE, McCONNELL, McCONOGHIE, McCORBE, McCORDALL, McCORMICK, McCOWAN, McCRACKEN, McCREE, McCULLOCH, McCULLOGH, McCUTCHEN, McCUTCHEON, McFFARLAN, MACFETRIDGE, McGEE, McGIMPSY, McGILL, McGILLBREEDY, McGILLIGAN, McGLOON, McGOWEN, McGUNN, McILLCOYLL, McILDUE, McILLDUFFE, McILTEGART, McKANLY, McKEE, McKEENE, McKENLEN, McKENLY, McKENNEY, McKENNY, McKER, McKEROGE, McKEY, McKEYNE, McKILCOME, McKILCRONE, McKILDUFFE, McKILTIRE, McKINNILEY, McKNOB, McLANLIN, McLEALAND, McLENTOG, McLOCHIN, McLOCKIN, McLOGHLIN, McLORNANE, McMAISTER, McMATH, McMISH, McMURRIN, McNARE, McNEAL, McNICOLL, McNILL, McROARTY, McRUDEN, McRUTTER, McSHADDEN, McSWINE, McWALLER, McWILLY, MEARE, MEDCALFE, MELL, MERCER, MERSTOUN, MERVYN, MERYWEATHER, MESSENGER, METLAND, MICHAEL, MICHELBURN, MICHELL, MILL, MILLER, MILLES, MITCHEL, MODERWELL, MOGRIDGE, MOLDRAGE, MOLLCHELLIN, MOLLINE, MONCREIFE, MONCRIEF, MONCRIEFF, MONCRIFF, MONKTON, MONNELL, MONRO, MONROE, MONROW, MONSERRANCE, MONT, MONTGOMERY, MONTGOMMERY, MOOR, MOORE, MOOREHEAD, MOOTE, MORDOCK, MORDOCKE, MORE, MORGAN, MORGES, MORE, MORGIN, MORISON, MORRICE, MORRIS, MORRISON, MORRISONN, MORROW, MORTHWAN, MOSSOM, MOULES, MOUNT, MOUSEROUN, MULHOLLAND, MULLAN, MUNDAY, MUNGOUMERYE, MUNNDLY, MUNNELLY, MUNROE, MURDOCK, MURE, MURPHETT, MURRAY, MURREY, MUTTERWELL, NAPPER, NAUGHTLEY, NEALE, NEALSON, NEELY, NEESBIT, NEILE, NEILSON, NELLAURE, NENMO, NESBIT, NESBITT, NESMITH, NEVILL, NEVILLE, NEVIN, NEWBURGH, NEWCOMB, NEWCOMEN, NEWEN, NEWMAN, NEWTON, NEWTOWN, NEWTOWNE, NICHOLS, NICHOLSON, NICHOLSONE, NICOLLSON, NIGHTINGALE, NILLEN, NISBET, NIXON, NOBLE, NORDE, NORMAN, NORRIS, NORY, NOTTRICE, NUTT, OBERY, O’BOWELL, O’BOYD, OBRE, O’BRELY, OBREY, O’BROLY, O’BYYNE, O’CANE, O’CAHAN, O’CAHN, O’CANAN, O’CANE, O’CANNAN, O’CATHAN, O’CHANE, O’CREVELLIN, O’CURRAN, O’DAYRE, O’DERMONT, O’DERRY, O’DEVENNY, O’DOGHERTIE, O’DOGHERTY, O’DOHERTY, O’DOHERTYE, O’DONNELL, O’DOWE, O’DREY, O’DURRYE, O’FENEY, O’GALLOGHER, O’GALLOHER, OGLE, O’GORMAN, O’GOWN, O’HAGARTIE, O’HAGARTY, O’HALLEY, O’HARKAN, O’HARLEY, O’HAVELAND, O’HEGARTIE, O’HEGARTY, O’HENRY, O’KEAN, O’KELLY, O’KELLEY, O’KINE, O’LAFFERTY, O’LANCARIE, O’LANIE, O’LASHEYE, O’LASHYE, O’LENERICK, O’LAULIN, O’LECKYE, OLFARDS, OLFEARD, OLFERT, O’LINE, O’LINSHANAN, O’MAULEY, O’MULLAN, O’NEAL, O’NEALE, O’NEIL, O’QUIGLEY, O’QUSTION, ORE, O’REALL, O’REGONE, ORNEAL, ORNELL, ORRELL, O’RELY, O’RENE, O’REYNE, ORMSBY, ORNOYLE, ORR, O’RODDEN, O’RYLIE, OSBORN, OSBURN, OSBORNE, OSBOURNE, O’SHEALE, O’SHEIL, O’SHENE, O’SHENKYE, O’SHERINE, O’SREAN, O’STEENE, O’STINE, O’STREENE, O’TAMENNY, O’TOY, OWENS, OWINS, PACKER, PACY, PAINE, PALMER, PARDEN, PAREY, PARKE, PARKER, PARKE, PARKER, PARKES, PARKS, PARSEY, PARSONS, PARTLET, PASLEY, PASSY, PATERSON, PATSHALL, PATSON, PATT, PATTERSON, PATTESHALL, PATY, PATYN, PAWLETT, PAYNTER, PERCY, PEAREMAN, PEARMAN, PEARSE, PEIRMON, PEIRSON, PERCEE, PENMAN, PEOPLES, PERPOYNT, PERRY, PETFEILD, PETT, PHETIS, PHILIPS, PHILLIPS, PICKARD, PICKIN, PIEMONT, PIERCE, PIERSON, PIGOT, PIGOTT, PILOT, PINKERTONN, PIOTT, PIREY, PIT, PITS, PITT, PITTS, PLATT, PLOTT, PLUNKET, PLUNKETT, POAGE, POAKE, POCK, POCKE, POGE, POKE, POLKE, POLLOCK, PONSONBY, POOK, POOKE, POOLIE, POOLE, PORTER, POTTS, POULTENEY, POULTON, POWELL, POWER, PREINT, PRENT, PRICE, PRIDION, PRIGEON, PRITTIE, PRITTY, PROPTER, PRYCE, PURDIE, PURDON, PUSTYE, QUALANE, QUANTAIN, QUIGGE, QUIGLEYE, QUIGLY, QUINTON, RABB, RAGSTON, RAILEY, RAIMAR, RAIMONDE, RAINEY, RAKNE, RAMESE, RAMIR, RAMSAY, RAMSEY, RAMSEYE, RANALDS, RANDALE, RANDLE, RANDOLL, RANICK, RANKEN, RANKIN, RANKINE, RANNELL, RANNELLS, RATCLIFFE, RAVEN, RAWDON, RAY, RAYE, RAYMON, RAYSDALE, REA, READ, READALL, READE, REALLY, REDDALL, REDGATE, REEDE, REIVES, RENEY, REYNOLDS, RICHARDE, RICHARDS, RICHARDSON, RICHARDSONN, RICE, RICHE, RICHER, RICHERSON, RICHEY, RICKEARDS, RICHMAN, RIDDAL, RIDDELL, RIDLEY, RILE, RINDE, RIPLEY, RISE, ROBACK, ROBERTON, ROBB, ROBENSON, ROBERT, ROBERTES, ROBERTS, ROBERTSON, ROBINS, ROBINSON, ROBINSONE, ROBISON, ROCHE, RODGER, RODGERS, ROE, ROES, ROGER, ROGERS, ROLE, ROOIN, ROOTELIDGE, ROSE, ROSS, ROSSAL, ROSSE, ROWAN, ROWAT, ROWE, ROWLEY, ROYD, ROYDE, ROYLY, RUDD, RUDDALL, RUDDEN, RUDDOCK, RUDE, RUDLE, RUE, RULE, RUSSELL, RUST, RUTTER, RYFORD, SACKFEILD, SADLER, SADOCK, SAMPSON, SAMPSONE, SAMSON, SANDELAM, SANDERS, SANDERSON, SANDYES, SANKEY, SAUNDERSON, SAVAGE, SCAMMON, SCOLLERS, SCOT, SCOTT, SCRIMGEOUR, SCRIMSEOUR, SEAR, SEARES, SEATON, SEMPILL, SEMPLE, SEYNTLOWE, SHANNON, SHARER, SHARPE, SHAW, SHAWE, SHELCROSS, SHELDON, SHELSHELTONN, SHERBY, SHERHARD, SHERINGTON, SHERLEY, SHERRARD, SHERRINGTON, SHERWOOD, SHEVINGTON, SHIRLOCK, SHOBURNE, SHORT, SHORTIDGE, SHREIFFE, SHURSBY, SIDBERT, SIDENHAM, SILL, SIMCOKE, SIMKINS, SIMPLE, SIMPSON, SIMS, SIMSON, SINCLAIR, SKAMON, SKEFFINGTON, SKELTON, SKERLET, SKEVINGTON, SKIFFINGTON, SKINER, SKINNER, SKIPTON, SKIPTONN, SKOT, SKYNNER, SLAMMON, SLATTER, SLATER, SLAUGHTER, SLEMON, SLOANE, SLONE, SLUANE SLURGEN, SMELLY, SMETY, SMITH, SMYTH, SMYTHE, SOLLERS, SOUTHERY, SPAN, SPARKES, SPARKS, SPEARE, SPENCER, SPIKE, SPREWELL, SPRINGHAN, SPROUSE, SPRUEL, SQUIRE, SQUIRL, STANHOPP, STANLEY, STANSBY, STAPLES, STARRET, STAYNE, STEEL, STEELE, STEENSON, STEILE, STENSON, STENSONN, STENSONNE, STERLINGE, STEVENSON, STEVSON, STEWARD, STEWART, STERLING, STEYNINGS, STILES, STILLYE, STINNSON, STINSON, STOCK, STOKKES, STOTESBURY, STRABRICK, STRABRIDG, STRANGE, STRINGER, STROBRIDGE, STRONG, STROUD, STUART, STUDDALL, STYNSON, SUTTON, SWAN, SWEATENHAM, SWEETNAM, SWOORLEY, SWYNE, SYD, SYMKINS, SYMONDS, SYMPSON, TACKETT, TAILZIOR, TAIRE, TALLEN, TALLON, TARBUTT, TARE, TARLETON, TASH, TATHE, TAYLOR, TEMPLE, TEMPLETINTON, TERRE, TERRY, THOMAS, THOMPSON, THOMSON, THORNTON, THORPE, TIFFANY, TINNEY, TOLLER, TOMKINS, TOMPSON, TOMPSONN, TOMSON, TOMSONE, TOOCKEY, TOPINE, TORESYTH, TOUCH, TOWERS, TOWNHAM, TOWNSEND, TOXONE, TOYDEN, TRACEY, TRACY, TRAICY, TRAPE, TREVERSE, TREVONE, TREVOR, TROWAN, TRUEMAN, TRUMAN, TUBMAN, TUCKER, TUCKEY, TURBAT, TURBET, TURBETT, TURNER, TYSE, UINSON, UPTON, VADELEY, VAIL, VALE, VAUDRY, VAUGHAN, VEASIE, VEASOY, VENABLES, VERETT, VERNOR, WADEN, WALDER, WALKER, WALL, WALLACE, WALLAS, WALLICE, WALLY, WALSH, WALTERS, WALTHAM, WANDERFORD, WARDE, WARDEN, WARDNER, WARDREN, WARNER, WARNET, WARREN, WASSEN, WASTLE, WATMOUTH, WATS, WATSEMON, WATSON, WATSONN, WATSONNE, WATT, WATTS, WAYNEMAN, WEBB, WEEKS, WEIR, WELL, WELLINGTON, WELLS, WELSH, WENDESFORD, WENNYS, WELSH, WESBY, WESCOINGE, WESGATE, WESSCOAT, WEST, WESTCOTE, WESTE, WESTGATE, WESTOCK, WESTON, WETHEROWE, WHALEY, WHARON, WHEADON, WHISTLER, WHITE, WHITEWELL, WHITLOE, WHITNEY, WHITTAKERS, WHITTLE, WHITWELL, WHYTE, WIGTOWN, WILDE, WILDRAGE, WILKINE, WILKINS, WILKINSON, WILL, WILLEMSON, WILLAGE, WILLIAM, WILLIAMS, WILLIAMSON, WILLINGTON, WILLIS, WILLSON, WILLSONE, WILLSONN, WILLYE, WILSON, WILSOUN, WINSLOW, WITAKER, WOLDREDG, WOLRIDGE, WOOD, WOODS, WOODSIDES, WOOL, WOOLL, WOOLDNEY, WOODES, WOODROSE, WOOLLEY, WOORK, WORKMAN, WRAY, WRAYE, WRIGHT, WURRAL, WYLDE, YALE, YARBAR, YARBOROY, YARBORROWE, YERBOREY, YORKE, YONGE, YOUNG, YOUNGE, ZACHARY

Monday, September 29, 2014

Scottish historian Tim Clarkson

This blog is primarily about the Scots-Irish in the New World from Colonial times to the present.  Occasionally, I will post items of interest concerning the history of the Scots-Irish prior to their migration to the New World.  Below is a link to the blog of Scottish historian Tim Clarkson, who is a leading researcher concerning early medieval Scottish history.  It is highly recommended.

Link:  Seanchus

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Ulster Heritage Magazine: News From Ballymoney Museum

Ulster Heritage Magazine: News From Ballymoney Museum: Dear Family Historian, It’s less than two weeks to ROUTE BACK HOME 2014 and the staff at Ballymoney Museum are getting everything re...

Monday, September 1, 2014

McCain's Corner: DNA Genetic Genealogy Sale

McCain's Corner: DNA Genetic Genealogy Sale: All the DNA projects I administer and assist with, use Family Tree DNA labs in Houston, Texas.  Why?  Well, they are the best, they have the...

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Scots-Irish DNA Project Update 13 August 2014

442 families are now participating in the Scots-Irish DNA project and the project is growing at a rapid pace.  We have enough DNA results to begin analysis of the group.  As expected, the Celtic haplogroups dominate, with R-M222 and R-L21 the largest two elements in the R1b Celtic group.  I haplogroups are running around 11% of total, which is also expected for men with origins in the Lowlands of Scotland and west Highlands.  One family of note, descendants of David Crockett are participating in the project and appear to be Norse in paternal ancestry.

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

The Great Wagon Road

The Great Wagon Road followed paths used by Indians and was the main roads by which the Scots-Irish moved south and west and peopled the backcountry and Southern Uplands.  In the 1700s and early 1800s The Fall Line Road and Upper Road became the most used segments of the road system and many Scots-Irish settlements were established along these routes from Pennsylvania to Georgia.
(Map from the book 'Map guide to American migration routes, 1735-1815'  by William Dollarhide.)

Sunday, July 13, 2014

Openning in Forest by David Wright


The Frontiersman by David Wright

David Wright's splendid illustration of a typical Scots-Irish frontiersman. 

The Scotch-Irish... 1816


"Ireland is divided into four provinces, viz. Munster, Connaught, Leinster and Ulster. Leinster is chiefly inhabited by what are called the English Irish, and Ulster the Scotch Irish - From the latter province at least three quarters of the emigrants to America, have come for many years past.  The Scotch-Irish, both by education and religion are inclined to Republicanism, or a free government.”

 

Junot’s Library
Saturday, September 14, 1816, Enquirer, Richmond, Virginia. pages 2,3

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Scots-Irish Art Work of David Wright

Before the Long Hunt by David Wright

Tennessean David Wright is a gifted and brilliant artist. Fortunately for us he often select Scots-Irish themed works.  His specialty is historical art. Link to purchase prints:  David Wright 

Monday, June 23, 2014

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Scots-Irish DNA Project Update 18 June 2014

Of this morning, the project has 384 families participating.  The results page is current and most kits have been grouped by haplogroup designation.  As many know, Family Tree recently expanded and revamped their haplogroup nomenclature and added many new designations.  On the results page the kits are listed under both the shorthand and full haplogroup name.  For those members that have tested various SNPs this has the potential for providing a lot of new data for your family history.

The geneticists are identifying more haplogroups downstream from the major groups. This will allow us to classify kits with more precision.  The end result is your kit will be in a haplogroup from a more recent genetic event.  In layman's terms, it will allow you to locate your family's geographic point of origin and identify your kinship group in historical times.  For Scottish origin families this is particularly useful information. (that clan and blood thing)

Many of the kits in the major haplogroups such as R-M269 or R-L21 would benefit from testing for downstream SNPs.

Some analysis of the Scots-Irish: 

The majority of the participants are as expected of Atlantic Zone Celtic origin. This will be a combination of Cumbric and Gaelic Celts native to Scotland.  The participants are running about 65% of Lowland Scottish origin and 35% Highland Scottish origin,.  There is a stereotype of all Scots-Irish being from 'the Lowlands' but many were from Argyll and Lennox in the southwest Highlands. This is showing up in the DNA results.

One interesting aspect, we have more I haplotypes than expected.  Some of these I subgroups are Scottish Norse/Norman in origin and others are indigenous to ancient Scotland.  It is a very complex group and I have not had time to read the latest research on the I subgroup origins.  We are dealing with a lot of very new material.

I highly recommend the books 'Britain Begins' and 'Celtic from the West 2' by Dr Barry Cunliffe for those who would like to read the latest research and thinking about the people who became the 'Scots-Irish.'   

Friday, June 6, 2014

Ulster Heritage Magazine: DNA Testing Transfer to Family Tree

Ulster Heritage Magazine: DNA Testing Transfer to Family Tree: Note... if you have done DNA testing with another company here is your opportunity to transfer your results to Family Tree DNA.  Our projec...

Monday, May 26, 2014

Historical illustrator: Well i decided to head to Monea Castle in County F...

Historical illustrator: Well i decided to head to Monea Castle in County F...: Well i decided to head to Monea Castle in County Fermanagh, to see Claiomh today. They are doing a show today as part of the 4-5 week dig pr...



(great post by Seán Ó Brógáin, you have seen his work in the Osprey books series.)

Sunday, May 25, 2014

Saturday, May 17, 2014

Monday, May 5, 2014

New Haplogroup Designations

Family Tree has released their new haplogroup designations.  However, there has been some issues with this release that are still being sorted out.  Participants in the Scots-Irish DNA project are asked to be patient while Family Tree corrects the issues.  You might see your kit in the results move around as these corrections are made. 

Ultimately, the new haplogroups will contribute to our ability to fix a point of origin of families in the project.  The geneticists are uncovering more SNPs which in time will have a geographic link.

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Ballymoney Genealogical Gathering

DO YOU HAVE ROOTS IN ‘THE ROUTE’?
If you have ancestors in North Antrim, then the Route Back Home 2014 is the place to find out more about your family history!
 
The exciting conference gives genealogists from across the world the opportunity to enjoy a unique series of lectures & research trips focusing on Ballymoney and district.
 
The Route Back Home will run from 24-27 September and will be based in Ballymoney Town Hall.  It has been developed to assist people who are specifically researching their ancestry in Ballymoney, Co. Antrim.  The conference is an opportunity to meet other people who share an interest in North Antrim, a region traditionally known as "the Route”.
 
The Route Back Home is run by Ballymoney Museum.  It is supported by the Coleraine Branch of the North of Ireland Family History Society (www. http://colerainefhs.org.uk/) and their members will be available to help delegates and provide advice throughout the conference.
 
HOW DO I BOOK MY PLACE?
Delegates must pay the full booking fee of £180 to be allocated a place at the conference.  Only 20 places are available and bookings cannot be confirmed until receipt of a completed booking form and full payment.  The conference fee includes:
  • Lectures on how to research your ancestry in North Antrim
  • Daily lunch and regular refreshments
  • Conference dinner and drinks reception
  • Research trips to Belfast and Ballymena
 
Please contact me at this email address if you require further information and I look forward to hopefully seeing you in September.
Regards,
 
Keith Beattie
Museum Manager

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

DNA Testing For Scots-Irish

The basics:  The Scots-Irish DNA project recommends the 111 marker Y chromosome DNA test.  If this is not within your budget, the 67 will do and the 37 is an acceptable start.  We use the Family Tree DNA lab in Houston, Texas.

Who are the 'Scots-Irish?'  Or Scotch-Irish?  Generally speaking the Scots-Irish are the descendants of settlers to Colonial and early Republic America from the nine counties of the province of Ulster, in Ireland.  As a group the Scots-Irish were majority Presbyterian, though not all were and most descended from Scots families that had migrated to Ireland.  Also of note, some 'Scots-Irish' migrated to the Colonies from other parts of Ireland outside of Ulster.

The main migration of Scots to Ireland came during the Ulster Plantation (circa 1609 to early 1700s).  These Scots came primarily from the Scottish Lowlands. There is also a substantial number of Highland Scots that became Scots-Irish.  Most of these Highland Scots descend from families from Argyll, Lennox, and the Hebrides, that migrated to Ulster in the 1500s. 

There are other components of the Scots-Irish which include French Huguenot, Manx, and Border English, who settled in Ulster and migrated to the New World in the Ulster Migration.  They married into and became part of the people and society we now call Scots-Irish.

There was also a large migration of Presbyterian Irish into Canada in the nineteenth century. They went mainly to New Brunswick and Ontario.  Many of these families were of 'Ulster Scots' ancestry from both Lowland Scottish and Highland Scottish ancestry.  In the past the term Scots-Irish has not been applied to this group, but increasingly the term has expanded to include the descendants of the Canadian migration. Nomenclature has been problematic in regards to the Scots-Irish for a long time.  The term today reflects a better awareness of the descendants of Ulster Scots in the Diaspora.

Most families 'know' or self-identify as Scots-Irish.  These are the families that are participating in the Scots-Irish DNA project.