Thursday, November 12, 2015

Scots Irish Surnames

Below is a list of families participating in the Scots-Irish DNA Project as of November 2015.  There are now over 900 participating families. 
 
The surnames are very typically 'Scots-Irish.'   The Lowland Scottish names draw very heavily from the western seaboard counties of the Lowlands, with many families from Ayrshire, Wigtown, Kirkcudbright, and Renfrew (using the older county names).   Most of the Lowland Scottish families migrated to Ireland post 1609.  
 
Many of the surnames, about 35% are of  Highland Scots ancestry.  The majority of these are from mid Argyll, Lennox, and the southern Hebrides.  Many of the Highland families migrated to Ireland in the mid to late 1500s. Mid Argyll and Lennox were areas influenced by the Reformed faith and this fact influenced their relationship with the Lowland Scots migrating to Ireland in the 1600s.
 
There are several native Irish families that became Scots-Irish, most of these were from the Bann valley and had converted to the Reformed faith or to the Establish Church by the late 1600s.   
 
The deep ancestry of these Scots-Irish families reveal that a large majority of them descend from the indigenous Celtic tribes of Scotland, over 84%, while the Norse and Norman origins coming in at about 10%. 
 
The Scots-Irish DNA Project is open to families of Scots-Irish ancestry.  The project has several goals, including reconnecting Scots-Irish in the Diaspora with their families that remained behind in Ireland.  Another goal is to locate a family's point of origin in Scotland and recover lost or forgotten family history.  
 
Multiple listings of a surname indicate the number of families with that surname participating.  You will see a lot of Highlanders with Campbell and MacDonald the two most numerous.  Several of the participating families are descended from famous Scots-Irish men, such as David Crockett (who turned about to be from Ayrshire ancestry, not Huguenot as often report in older history books).

Families interested in participating can do so by contacting the Scots-Irish DNA Project.

Click on a page to enlarge:




15 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Not really missing, it is just that no Berry family has yet participated in the Scots Irish DNA Project. The list is growing rapidly, so I expect eventually some Berry families will join. Hope so.

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  2. Wow! Thank you. I am a direct descendent of the Clark,Dunlop,Dunlap,Murray,Crockett,and Sinclair's. I would love more info

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    1. It is an interesting project, finding out those families that identify as Scots-Irish here in the 21st Century. Many of the participating families have located their family that remained behind in Ireland and have reconnected the family, which is particularly rewarding.

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  3. Do you have to be strictly Scots Irish to participate? Most of my family's names are on the list and they're from Tyrone and possibly Derry. However we have a few ancestors from Cork.

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    1. With this project, we require the families self identify as 'Scots-Irish.' But, that group is more diverse than the stereotype. Generally the families of Ulster Scots origins, but many of the families from outside of Ulster, from Mayo, Sligo, Dublin, Cork, etc., some are native Irish families that became part of Scots-Irish society in the Colonies, also a lot a Highland Scots, Manx, Border English, and Welsh, became part of the group.

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  4. Replies
    1. The list is only of families that have joined the project and participated in the DNA testing. The project is growing rapidly, so very likely some Bulger families will join.

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  5. I'm a Shaw. I would love to know if there is any others that are too.

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  6. We are Scots-irish but incredibly distantly. My maiden name is McElhaney, but that name (as many others in our tribe) is only because Scottish Traders married high ranking [Wind Clan] Creek women about 300 years ago

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  7. My Ancestors are from Cork the O'Sheehan clan.

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  8. No McNaul or McAnaul. We know they came from the Scottish Highlands. The name is quite common in the US and Canada where they emigrated from Ireland and Scotland. Just can't find much about them in their own countries!

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